Javascript Downloads for XP

Ryan Dube
Javascript Downloads for XP
Audio Javascript

Many people looking for Javascript downloads for XP are often a little bit confused about what they actually need. There are a variety of security and configuration issues between Java, Javascript and Windows XP, and those issues often create confusion for XP users. The following article outlines the most common issues XP users have when they're attempting to load web pages that use Javascript, and methods you can use to resolve those issues.

Why Javascript Downloads for XP might Cause a Problem

There is a variety of reasons XP users may have problems when they attempt to visit a website that has Javascript. The most common issue is that the browser you're using is configured to block all Javascripts. The second common issue is that people often confuse the error for Java with an issue that involves Javascript, when it really doesn't. The third issue is that some web page designers attempt to test web pages that have Javascript locally, and on Windows XP with Service Pack 2, the Javascript is blocked due to security settings. The following sections detail each of these common issues and how to resolve them.

How to Enable Javascript in Your Browser

Here at LoveToKnow Web Design, you'll find a number of guides on how to enable Javascript for your browser. There's even a slideshow that walks you through the process. The instructions below provide a very simple step-by-step guide to enable Javascript for IE or Firefox when you're using Windows XP.

If you're using Internet Explorer:

  1. Click on Tools in the top menu
  2. Click on the "Internet Options" selection
  3. Click on the "Security" tab
  4. Click on "Custom Level"
  5. Scroll down to "Scripting" and make sure "Active Scripting" is enabled.

If you're using Firefox:

  1. Click on Tools in the top menu
  2. Click on the "Options" selection
  3. Click on the "Content" tab
  4. Select the "Enable JavaScript" box

As you can see, enabling your browser (whether or not you're using Windows XP) to process JavaScript on a web page is a fairly straightforward procedure. There are two common issues that Windows XP users have with JavaScript, and those are detailed below.

Testing a Website on your Local PC

The Problem: Web designers often create web pages that they store on their local hard drive. Some designers who use Windows XP found that when they tried to open those local HTML files, the browser would issue an alert for "Active Content" and block the page from properly loading. This happens when the web designer incorporates some Javascript into those web pages that are stored on the local hard drive. However, the same web pages stored on a remote web server would load and run fine.

The Cause: The reason this happens is because when Microsoft issued Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2), the default security setting for Javascript was that any HTML files stored locally and running Javascript presented a security risk. For this reason, Microsoft disabled Internet Explorer's ability to run local Javascript files, while enabling the ability to run JavaScript if the source file isn't located on the local machine. For web designers who are trying to test their website locally, this presents strange security errors.

The Solution: The way to remove this security error is to open up Internet Explorer and go through the following steps.

  1. Click on Tools in the top menu
  2. Click on the "Internet Options" selection
  3. Click on the "Security" tab
  4. Click on "Custom Level"
  5. Scroll down to "Scripting" and make sure "Allow Active Content to Run on My Computer" is enabled.

Once you enable that selection, you can use Internet Explorer to test your locally stored, JavaScript-enabled website without any problems.

Java is NOT JavaScript

A common confusion for many novice Internet users is the difference between Java and Javascript. Some websites incorporate Java applications, embedded right into the web page. In order to run properly, these application require a "Java Runtime" client to be installed on the client PC. If you don't have Java Runtime on your PC, you'll receive an error that states there's a problem with the "Java runtime environment" or a related message. Many users believe this error means that JavaScript isn't enabled, but when they check they see that it is. If you are receiving a "Java Runtime", then you need to download the client application. You often know this is the case when there's a blank gray box on the web page that doesn't display anything. However, once you the download Java Runtime environment and then refresh the web page, you'll find that the application runs as it should.

Final Words

Ever since Javascript was first created, it represented a convenient way for web designers to create much more interactive and interesting websites. The downside is that along with innovation often comes confusion. Hopefully, if you are experiencing problems and looking for Javascript Downloads for XP, you now have a better understanding of how Javascript actually works and how you can resolve your particular issue.

Javascript Downloads for XP